Recent NPR appearances -Latino USA, Talk of the Nation

Here are links to my recent appearances on National Public Radio talking about the Haiti earthquake and Dominican-Haitian relations.

Latino USA, January 21 The Haiti Tragedy (scroll down to  Haiti, the Dominican Republic, and Latin America)

Talk of the Nation, January 25: To Rebuild, Put Haitians in the Lead

U.S. and European Perspectives on Immigration

The American Council on Germany, the German Marshall Fund of the United States, the World Policy Institute and Demos present
“U.S. and European Perspectives on Immigration: A Problem or an Opportunity?”

a discussion and luncheon featuring

Delancey Gustin, Immigration and Integration Program, The German Marshall Fund of the United States
and
Michele Wucker, Executive Director, World Policy Institute


This event comes on the heels of the release of Transatlantic Trends: Immigration, which compares transatlantic as well as cross-country opinion on immigration and integration issues. Some of the topics included in this year’s survey are: public perception of immigrants’ labor market impacts and effects on wages, the effect of the economic crisis on attitudes toward immigration, and preferences for temporary vs. permanent labor migration programs. The survey also gauges opinion on a legalization program for illegal immigrants and asks respondents to rate their governments’ current job of immigration management.

When:
Wednesday, January 27
12:15 – 2 PM

Where:
Demos
220 Fifth Avenue (between 26th and 27th streets)
Fifth Floor conference room
New York, New York

RSVP: This lunch and event are free and open to the public, but advance registration is required to reserve a seat and help us minimize waste when ordering.  RSVP by e-mailing events@worldpolicy.org or calling 212.481.5005 option 2.

“Right to Move” conference Dec 12-13 in Tokyo

I’ll be speaking at the “Right to Move: Debating the Ethics of Global Migration” conference at Sophia University in Tokyo, Japan, December 12-13th, 2009, organized by Carnegie Council Global Policy Innovations and Sophia University Institute of Comparative Culture.

Here’s a description of my presentation:

Linking Ethics and Self-Interest in Human Mobility
Facing demographic and economic challenges, countries around the world are reconsidering the policies that govern migrant rights: the basis on which people are allowed to enter a country, the access that non-citizens have to services and rights, and the ability of non-citizens to naturalize. What are the consequences for citizens, societies, and economies of the decisions they make about who gets the right to move? How do limitations on the rights of others to move to a country, to become citizens, and to participate in the workforce and in social and political structures affect established citizens of those countries? What are the most ethical regimes involving human mobility—and how do they compare to policies that might maximize the well-being of citizens and non-citizens?

Panel descriptions and biographies are HERE

You can find the full agenda HERE

“Breaking the Immigration Stalemate” report released

As many of you know, I was back and forth to Washington, DC many times over the past year to take part in an unusual gathering of scholars and thinkers on immigration policy. The Brookings-Duke Immigration Policy Roundtable organizers, Noah Pickus, Peter Skerry and Bill Galston convened a group as diverse as possible without members being likely to strangle each other by being in the same room –but they weren’t far off! The idea was to see what this disparate bunch could agree on (or at least agree to disagree on), in hopes that it might provide some guidance to the Obama administration as it tackles long-overdue immigration reform. We made it through somehow with a report that would have been different had I (or any of us) written it ourselves. Nevertheless, it gives a pretty good sense of some of the tradeoffs that might be politically feasible and result in a policy that, while not perfect, would significantly improve upon the mess that we have now.

That report, available in PDF format here, was released October 6. Links to the executive summary, the Spanish version, and the Brookings launch event transcript are available here. I’ll be part of a panel discussing it further at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, DC on October 23.

Here’s more information about the report:

Breaking the Immigration Stalemate

Breaking the Immigration Stalemate

The Obama administration has committed itself to immigration reform. Yet despite all the shortcomings of current policy — threats to the rule of law, exploitation of vulnerable newcomers, real and perceived competition with Americans for jobs and public resources — reasonable compromise on immigration will be exceedingly difficult. The divide between elite and public opinion on this issue remains deep and wide. It is a critical factor in the lack of trust that pervades today’s political culture.

This distrust was readily apparent in November 2008 when the Immigration Policy Roundtable first convened its twenty participants. The Roundtable is a joint undertaking of the Brookings Institution and the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke University. The group’s distinctive feature is that its members came to the table with divergent, often conflicting perspectives on immigration. In fact, the range of political and ideological views represented at the Roundtable is unprecedented in recent immigration policymaking. Continue reading ““Breaking the Immigration Stalemate” report released”

Carnegie Council interview on global migration and ethics

Carnegie Council Global Policy Innovations posted a Global Ethics Forum Interview with me August 11 as part of its “Ethics in Business” series
Click HERE for this radio interview with Michele Wucker by Julia Kennedy

“People should be able to pursue whatever helps them to fulfill their greatest potential, and that’s what migration is about,” says World Policy Institute’s Michele Wucker.

Newsday article quote on immigrants returning to Ecuador

Newsday quoted me in a July 20 article, “Ecuador Urges Immigrants to Come Back Home,” by Sumathi Reddy. The article talks about programs to finance returning migrants who want to set up businesses. Click on the article title to read the story.

Chapter in new book GETTING IMMIGRATION RIGHT

I’ve written a chapter in the new book, GETTING IMMIGRATION RIGHT: WHAT EVERY AMERICAN NEEDS TO KNOW, edited by David Coates and Peter Siavalis and published by Potomac Press. My chapter deals with changing conceptions of citizenship, based on some of the work I did during my 2007 Guggenheim Fellowship. It’s about the ways in which nations around the globe are changing laws and customs governing who is allowed to become a citizen and how the naturalization process works, even as they debate the shifting norms about the rights and responsibilities that citizenship entails.

Please pick up a copy of the book at your favorite bookstore or online!

The book is based on a conference that David and Peter organized in Fall 2007 at Wake Forest University. Here’s the video of my session with Mark Miller (I start speaking at around 28:00)

Keynote Address on Global Migration at Adelphi May 14

I’ll be delivering the keynote address on Immigration: Global Economics and Local Communities on May 14 at Adelphi University.

The full event, “Immigration on Long Island: New Directions and Opportunities for Civic Engagement,” organized by the Center for Social Innovation, will be held Thursday, May 14, 2009, from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., at Adelphi’s Thomas Dixon Lovely Ballroom in the Ruth S. Harley University Center, 1 South Avenue, Garden City, NY.

A discussion will follow with panelists:

  • The Honorable Edward Romaine, Suffolk County Legislator, 1st District
  • Dr. Margaret Gray, assistant professor of political science, Adelphi University
  • Mr. David Dyssegaard Kallick, senior fellow, Fiscal Policy Institute

Details are available at:
http://www.adelphi.edu/socialinnovation/events.php